Three ‘parties’ fight for seats in Scituate elections

Three ‘parties’ fight for seats in Scituate elections

SCITUATE – Seventeen candidates are running for a spot on the seven-seat Scituate Town Council this election season, including six of the seven incumbent Republican council members and returning members of the former “Independent Men” majority.

Primaries will not reduce the number of candidates to appear on the Nov. 3 ballot for Scituate Town Council, and will feature seven Republicans, six Democrats, and four independent candidates.

Of the endorsed Republicans, six of the seven incumbent councilors will seek re-election, including Council President James Brady, and Councilors Abbie Groves, Charles Collins, David D’Agostino, Gary Grande, and Timothy McCormick. Councilor Brenda Frederickson is not seeking re-election after serving seven terms on the council.

Republican Town Committee Chairwoman Theresa Yeaw is taking Frederickson’s place on the ballot. She is also a member of the Scituate Capital Committee. Yeaw lost her campaign for town clerk against incumbent Town Clerk Margaret “Peggy” Long, a Democrat, two years ago.

Yeaw said Frederickson, who could not be reached for comment, spent 20 years serving the town with 12 years on the council and eight years as public welfare director. She said Frederickson is now looking forward to running her business.

Two of the Independent Men who held a majority on the council from 2016 to 2018 are taking another run for office after being ousted two years ago. Former Council President John Mahoney and former Councilor Nicholas Izzi, both independents, filed their intent to run last week.

In 2018, Izzi and Mahoney received the lowest vote totals of the four Independent Men, earning 4.7 percent and 4.4 percent of the vote.

Since leaving the council, Mahoney’s leadership on the Scituate Police Station Building Committee through November of 2018 has been the subject of heavy criticism. Despite promising a building at $1.7 million, a new board went back to the voters to borrow an additional $860,000 to finish the job, which was more than a year overdue. Mahoney did not respond to a request for comment on his new bid for council.

Independent Thomas Galligan is also seeking election to the council. Galligan also ran for office in 2018, receiving the lowest vote total at 3.4 percent. Galligan is a member of the Police Station Building Committee that successfully completed the partially constructed building. He is not associated with the Independent Men of the former council majority.

Recently retired Scituate Police Chief Donald Delaere is also running as an independent for council. In his declaration papers, Delaere listed his political party as “Independent-Good Government,” and he said he is not affiliated with the Independent Men.

According to Scituate Democrat Town Committee Chairwoman Alicia Ann Kelley, Delaere was not able to run as a Democrat due to an administrative error, and is running as a independent with the Democrats’ full support.

“We can’t legally endorse him, but he is running ‘with us,’” Kelley said.

Delaere announced his June 27 retirement on June 11. He said he had a run for office in mind for a long time, and wanted to continue to serve the community, which “is the one I love so much.”

“I just want the honor to continue to serve my town and I would be extremely humbled to be given the chance to be elected to the Scituate Town Council,” he said.

Also for Town Council, Democrats endorsed former state Rep. Michael Marcello, Scituate Housing Authority member Terrell Parker, Debra Archetto, Annamarie Cimini, William Austin, and former Scituate Business Association member Sacha Hummel.

Marcello served four terms on the council, 1996 to 1998 and 2000 to 2006. He lost a run for School Committee in 2018 to Mary Manning-Morse.

Archetto landed the eighth spot in the 2018 Town Council election with 6.6 percent of the vote followed by fellow Democrat Kimberly Smith with 6.4 percent. Archetto ran a platform based on collaborative, civil relations with residents and government.

Hummel, who has served on numerous town boards, says the time is now to “create change in my tiny town of Scituate.”

Unlike in most towns, where an independent candidate typically runs alone, Scituate typically has a number of independents run, often together, creating a sort of three-party tussle for control of town politics.

Two seats in the five-member Scituate School Committee are up for election this year, with one member, Republican James Scacco, Jr., not seeking re-election.

Incumbent Democrat Carolyn Dias is seeking another four-year term and is endorsed by the town committee. She is accompanied in the run for School Committee by endorsed Democrat Kevin Pendergast.

Pendergast is husband to School Committee member Coleen Pendergast, also a Democrat, who is in the middle of a four-year term.

Allen Durand, member of the PSBC, is running for School Committee as a Democrat. He and independent Joseph Maggiacomo III are running on similar platforms to bring change to the district, according to Maggiacomo.

The Scituate Republicans endorsed two candidates, Joseph Murray and Walter Rowe, for School Committee.

Town Clerk Margaret “Peggy” Long is running for another two years after 20 years in office. She is challenged by Republican Robert Dexter.

In the race for state representative in District 41, representing Scituate and Cranston, Republican incumbent Robert Quattrocchi is endorsed by the party for his third term.

Democrats endorsed Pamela Carosi for the District 41 seat. She will face Democrat Giuseppe “Joe” Mattiello, cousin of House Speaker Nicholas Mattiello, in the primary on Sept. 8.

The winner will go on to face Quattrocchi in the general election.

In other state races, Sen. Gordon Rogers, Republican, in District 21, representing parts of Coventry, Foster and Scituate, will go unchallenged for a second term in office. Rogers immediately announced his candidacy following Sen. Nicholas Kettle’s resignation from office in February 2018.

Rogers defeated independent Michael Fine and Democrat James Safford in the 2018 election, earning 42.5 percent of the vote.

Candidates have until July 10 to file nomination papers with signatures.